Content [is/is not] King (delete as appropriate)

An interesting debate was sparked within LinkedIn’s Chief Content Officer group today. It centred around the (now rather tiresome) adage that ‘Content is King.’ It began when Ben Dorsey, a VP Marketing and Communications in Indiana, suggested that if Content is King, the organisation of that content is Queen. Disagreeing with this viewpoint (and struggling with the premise that organisation of anything can be particularly regal) I waded into the debate and aired my view that content isn’t ‘King,’ and that in fact, as suggested by the writer and activist Cory Doctorow, content is just something to talk about. It is actually the conversation triggered by the contentthat actually wears the crown. (continued..)

Who wears the crown?

(By way of warning, the liberal use of metaphors in this debate only gathers pace from this point on).

Stephen Berner, a content creator in NY, believes there is no King or Queen. Rather, there are multilple plates to be spun, ‘at the same velocity,’ and ‘incrementally dialled up.’ ‘Content is useless,’ he says, ‘unless it can be found..’

Margot Carmichael Lester, a content strategist from North Carolina, suggests that ‘..regardless of who wears the crown, CCOs and other content managers need to be the power behind the throne..’

King, Queen, Throne, Crown, Plates, Power, whatever, it seems to me that Ben’s original comment, his original content and the ensuing conversation, confirms that relevant content, made available at the right time, in the right format, for the right audience, inevitably triggers all-important conversation..

Have a read of the exchange in context in the LinkedIn CCO group.

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Holidays mean Facebook games right? Wrong.

An interesting article posted by Tricia Duryee on AllThingsD today, appears to confirm, if confirmation were needed, the need for businesses of all kinds to ensure they take mobile into account both for product and for engagement.

The article, entitled ‘Americans Played Anything but Social Games During the Holidays,‘ explains that during the Christmas period, when people are away from work and no longer spending prolonged periods in front of a computer, participation in online games via Facebook dropped considerably.

Whilst it’s no surprise that a great deal of social interaction via Facebook takes place at the workplace, the scale of the apparent dropoff during the holiday period may well raise some eyebrows at Facebook.

Contrast the drop with the gains made in mobile and there’s a clear case to ensure mobile is part of the marketing mix for the coming year. A statement of the obvious perhaps, but the AllThingsD article is the first time I’ve seen activity contrast so markedly during a crucial period for measuring and guaging social attitudes.